Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Addiction to Cigarettes | Diabetes Health Page

Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Addiction to Cigarettes

By KrisTina | Articles

Sep 22

Those who have to deal with chronic conditions usually have higher nutrient demands than a completely healthy person would. These nutrients are considered conditionally essential.

There is either oxidative stress, underlying inflammation, a disruption in one’s metabolic processes, or, for that matter, an inability of sorts to meet the metabolic demands with the nutrients reserves one currently has.

Nutrients has published a study a while ago, in which they reported that those patients who were pre-diabetic, smokers, or with type II diabetes, have lower plasma within their vitamin C levels. This is logical, as most experts have linked chronic inflammation with insulin resistance.

So, naturally, there will be higher vitamin C requirements, in order to mitigate the oxidative stress. But it’s not like this is the only contributing factor. Other factors which may lead to this are the excretion of vitamin C in individuals with microalbuminuria.

What the Research Says

Or perhaps the competition for vitamin C and glucose into the cells. This new study involved 89 participants, all over the age of 18. Some had either pre-diabetes, a normal fasting glucose, or type 2 diabetes.

Between these groups, researchers did not witness any significant differences when it comes to the macronutrient dietary vitamin C intake. However, in the participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the plasma vitamin C concentrations were noticeably lower.

Additionally, in the diabetes group and the pre-diabetes group, the vitamin C deficiency was at a much higher percentage. As a result, researchers demonstrated that smoking history, BMI, intake of dietary vitamin C, and fasting glucose are all significant markers of vitamin C plasma concentrations.

Which indicates what those who have a history of pre-diabetes, smoking, obesity, and diabetes have indeed greater requirements for vitamin C.

Which means such patients should consider vitamin C supplementation, in order to support their general health as well as prevent any further complications.

Certain previous research suggested that about 200 grams of vitamin C a day can cause a significant reduction in one’s glucose concentrations.

But the fact remains that the exact nutrient dosage can vary from individual to individual, when it comes to maintaining the best possible health.

Environmental exposures coupled with lifestyle choices and filtered through a genetic predisposition represent fundamental factors.

This, when it comes to the occurrence and development of disease. That’s why careful investigation of all these factors is key to an effective treatment approach.

Some Further Information

On the subject of insulin resistance, other vital nutrients include inositol and vitamin E. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has published a study back in 2015.

In it, they reported that about 1/3 of Americans who have metabolic syndrome, compared to healthy individuals, cannot effectively absorb dietary vitamin E. And yet even more research has witnessed that a deficiency in inositol is rather common in those with insulin resistance.

This is characterized by an inability (or reduced ability) to metabolize, process, and successfully use inositol form one’s meals. This indeed represents a distinctive characteristic of insulin resistance.

The result may be that such individuals may not fully meet their nutritional requirements. Especially not by a simple change in one’s diet. In such cases, inositol should certainly be considered a conditionally essential nutrient for these patients.

Source: Designs For HealthNutrients